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Redwall The Graphic Novel

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It was meant to be: The classic fantasy adventure that began the Redwall phenomenon is finally available in a cool graphic format. Illustrated by renowned comics artist Bret Blevins, Redwall: The Graphic Novel brings to life all the battles, all the heroes, and all the villains in a fun new format perfect for reluctant readers, those just entering the Redwall world, or the It was meant to be: The classic fantasy adventure that began the Redwall phenomenon is finally available in a cool graphic format. Illustrated by renowned comics artist Bret Blevins, Redwall: The Graphic Novel brings to life all the battles, all the heroes, and all the villains in a fun new format perfect for reluctant readers, those just entering the Redwall world, or the countless existing fans of the series.


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It was meant to be: The classic fantasy adventure that began the Redwall phenomenon is finally available in a cool graphic format. Illustrated by renowned comics artist Bret Blevins, Redwall: The Graphic Novel brings to life all the battles, all the heroes, and all the villains in a fun new format perfect for reluctant readers, those just entering the Redwall world, or the It was meant to be: The classic fantasy adventure that began the Redwall phenomenon is finally available in a cool graphic format. Illustrated by renowned comics artist Bret Blevins, Redwall: The Graphic Novel brings to life all the battles, all the heroes, and all the villains in a fun new format perfect for reluctant readers, those just entering the Redwall world, or the countless existing fans of the series.

30 review for Redwall The Graphic Novel

  1. 4 out of 5

    Montzalee Wittmann

    Wonderful Redwall:The graphic novel is just as exciting as the regular novel if not more! I enjoyed the terrific art work and the story which takes follows the original novel but only with less words and more visual clues.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kailey (BooksforMKs)

    Matthias Mouse, whose home is being attacked by the evil rat Cluny the Scourge, is on a quest to recover the legendary sword of Martin of Redwall, so that he can meet Cluny in battle. There are riddles and secret passageways, old enemies and unexpected friends, and of course, several mighty battle scenes! I adore the full novel, Redwall, so seeing it in graphic form was exciting! There is so much more depth to the story that couldn't be included in this format, but it still managed to Matthias Mouse, whose home is being attacked by the evil rat Cluny the Scourge, is on a quest to recover the legendary sword of Martin of Redwall, so that he can meet Cluny in battle. There are riddles and secret passageways, old enemies and unexpected friends, and of course, several mighty battle scenes! I adore the full novel, Redwall, so seeing it in graphic form was exciting! There is so much more depth to the story that couldn't be included in this format, but it still managed to fit most everything in there, although it feels a bit rushed. I wasn't really a fan of the artwork. Too many teeth. Literally every evil creature was just all teeth and gaping eyeballs. bleh. And I had pictured the good creatures as more cute, not quite so ferocious and homely. After all, they are supposed to be peaceful abbey dwellers, so I imagined them as dignified for the old ones or cute for the younger ones. Oh well. I would recommend reading this if you've already read the novel Redwall, and it's a lovely revisit to the story!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    I did not realize this book existed in graphic form until I specifically perused the card catalog for my library. Redwall was a favorite book of my son and mine when he was much younger. This is a story of anthropomorphic animals who live in an Abbey. Brian Jacques was the original author. He knew how to spin a yarn - or several since there are 21 books in the series. I loved the revisit to Mossflower Woods. The graphics are in black and white which was an initial disappointment to me, I did not realize this book existed in graphic form until I specifically perused the card catalog for my library. Redwall was a favorite book of my son and mine when he was much younger. This is a story of anthropomorphic animals who live in an Abbey. Brian Jacques was the original author. He knew how to spin a yarn - or several since there are 21 books in the series. I loved the revisit to Mossflower Woods. The graphics are in black and white which was an initial disappointment to me, but I was quickly drawn in and didn't really notice after that.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Clelixedda

    The original Redwall series is one of my all-time childhood favourites and this cute graphic novel is a very nice way to revisit the story. The 5 star rating is probably mainly for nostalgic reasons, but I am so biased that I cannot estimate how I would have rated this book had I not known and loved the story already. Quite a lot of the illustrations where very close to how I imagined the scenes back then, although it’s a pity that he left out all the feasts - in my memory always the best part o The original Redwall series is one of my all-time childhood favourites and this cute graphic novel is a very nice way to revisit the story. The 5 star rating is probably mainly for nostalgic reasons, but I am so biased that I cannot estimate how I would have rated this book had I not known and loved the story already. Quite a lot of the illustrations where very close to how I imagined the scenes back then, although it’s a pity that he left out all the feasts - in my memory always the best part of the books.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Betsy

    Once there may have been a need for warrior mice to guard Redwall Abbey, but those days have long since passed. Now the most that young Matthias can hope for is to someday become an abbot himself. As they say, the days of the warrior are past. Or rather, they would be if Cluny the Scourge and his crew of blood-thirsty rats weren't travelling straight for the Abbey with murder on their minds. Now the good animals must band together to fight this terrible invader. For Matthias, that means going on Once there may have been a need for warrior mice to guard Redwall Abbey, but those days have long since passed. Now the most that young Matthias can hope for is to someday become an abbot himself. As they say, the days of the warrior are past. Or rather, they would be if Cluny the Scourge and his crew of blood-thirsty rats weren't travelling straight for the Abbey with murder on their minds. Now the good animals must band together to fight this terrible invader. For Matthias, that means going on a quest of his own to recover and use the word of the legendary Martin the Warrior. In his own small way, Matthias is the only hope for a land now torn asunder by war. In the essence of space, much has been lost in terms of descriptions and smells. Jacques ranks right up there with Laura Ingalls Wilder and Grace Lin when it comes to writing about the true glories of delicious abundant food. Tasty morsels get short shrift in Moore's version though, and that's a true pity. I'm sure that with the right text, illustrator Bret Blevins could whip up delicious baked goods and succulent soups if the need arose. At 148 pages this work is faithful, but I can't help but imagine what would have happened if Philomel had gone all the way and produced a 200+ lush full-color edition with time spent on character and scope. Nothing against the black and white pages, mind you. In this age of flashy computer-drawn hues and tones it was kind of a relief to see the events of this story playing out in good old-fashioned gritty grays and blacks. Still, you get the sense that the 148-page limit should have been pushed a little farther. As I am given to understand it, this adaptation was originally published overseas, so there was little the American publisher Philomel could do once they brought it over. Perhaps if it is successful they'll consider future installments at a more extensive length. Illustrator Bret Blevins is primarily known for his work with big comic book powerhouses like Marvel and DC Comics, but his style takes many of its cues from real life. For this particular book he would have had to create a rat worthy of Cluny's grotesque evil. Certainly Blevins' work with musculature and action serves him particularly well in the massive battle and action sequences. At the same time, the good guys in this book had to look at least a little tough. It's all well and good to read a story about adorable woodland creatures going to war, but if your characters are too adorable then there isn't any life in them. Blevins does a good job at balancing this all out. I noticed that an Amazon reviewer figured that for people unfamiliar with the original book, this graphic novel would be impossible to figure out on one's own. They thought the images here to be difficult to follow. I admit to not having that problem, but I have read the book before so maybe that helped me. Looking at it, the black and white images on the slick shiny paper could be confusing to kids that haven't read graphic novels before. I definitely wouldn't consider this to be a starter GN. Still, for those kids who know their comics and are well-acquainted with following detailed panels and a myriad of different forms and angles, this shouldn't prove to be a difficult read. Blevins does a fine job of distinguishing between one mouse and another, even with this massive cast of characters. In the end, this new "Redwall" is a fun graphic novel and well worth a look to anyone unfamiliar with the very first story. Read the comic, then read the book. There is much to be gained from both.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    This graphic novel adaptation of Brian Jacques classic Redwall offers a quick overview of the story line. Set in Mossflower county in Redwall Abby, young Matthais dreams of being a great mouse warrior like Martin. When Cluny the Scourge attacks the Abby, Matthais must find Martin's sward and defend his home. With the help of his forest friends Matthais defeats Cluny and his amy becoming the warrior mouse of Redwall and champion of the order. When compared to the classic Redwall, the g This graphic novel adaptation of Brian Jacques classic Redwall offers a quick overview of the story line. Set in Mossflower county in Redwall Abby, young Matthais dreams of being a great mouse warrior like Martin. When Cluny the Scourge attacks the Abby, Matthais must find Martin's sward and defend his home. With the help of his forest friends Matthais defeats Cluny and his amy becoming the warrior mouse of Redwall and champion of the order. When compared to the classic Redwall, the graphic novel leaves something to be desired. The flashy graphic illustrations pale in comparison to Jacques masterful language which creates images from words. Most of the story is left out and only highlighted by the major battles. I would only recommend Redwall: The Graphic Novel to a struggling reader to interest them in reading the full length story, helping them bridge the gap between graphic novel and chapter book.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kelsey Hanson

    If you look at some of my previous reviews it is painfully obvious that I LOVE the Redwall series. This review is based stictly on how the artist adapted that story and not the actual plot of the story itself. If you want my thoughts on that one go read my other review. This book was a bit disappointing for me. The artwork itself is fairly impressive but maany scenes that could have easily been included were cut, especially the feasts! There are also main characters who get little more than a me If you look at some of my previous reviews it is painfully obvious that I LOVE the Redwall series. This review is based stictly on how the artist adapted that story and not the actual plot of the story itself. If you want my thoughts on that one go read my other review. This book was a bit disappointing for me. The artwork itself is fairly impressive but maany scenes that could have easily been included were cut, especially the feasts! There are also main characters who get little more than a mention including Cornflower and many of the villains of Cluny's horde. As a fan of the original series, this graphic novel bummed me out but the story is still good and the artwork isn't bad either.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jessalyn King

    I feel like I may have enjoyed the book book of this better. This graphic novel edition was OK, but it had a few issues. #1: the drawings weren't good enough to be able to distinguish between the characters. This becomes a problem for #2 #2: the lack of female mice. There was one as a love interest, of sorts, but it wasn't made obvious. She is a character at the beginning, she may be somewhere in the middle (but I couldn't tell if she was present), and then at the end, she' I feel like I may have enjoyed the book book of this better. This graphic novel edition was OK, but it had a few issues. #1: the drawings weren't good enough to be able to distinguish between the characters. This becomes a problem for #2 #2: the lack of female mice. There was one as a love interest, of sorts, but it wasn't made obvious. She is a character at the beginning, she may be somewhere in the middle (but I couldn't tell if she was present), and then at the end, she's creepily gifted to Matthias as a wife. Hmm. #3: I'm curious as to the age of Matthias: he seems like he's meant to be a child at the beginning, but maybe he's supposed to be a teenager? But then at the end he's gifted a wife. It'll always come back to that. That's just mega creepy. I've been told it's a tad bit less creepy in the book book, but still. #4: the writing was a bit stilted.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    This brought back memories of reading the actual novel for the first time many years ago. The series was such a big part of my childhood and developing who I am now. Since it is such a short graphic novel, the story is much condensed, but it's a fun read if you're already in love with the Redwall world and just want to see it in picture form. The art is pretty good. The good guys are cute, the bad guys are delightfully evil looking, and the backgrounds and the abbey itself are beautiful. I'd rec This brought back memories of reading the actual novel for the first time many years ago. The series was such a big part of my childhood and developing who I am now. Since it is such a short graphic novel, the story is much condensed, but it's a fun read if you're already in love with the Redwall world and just want to see it in picture form. The art is pretty good. The good guys are cute, the bad guys are delightfully evil looking, and the backgrounds and the abbey itself are beautiful. I'd recommend this for a lazy day read when you hear Redwall calling you back.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Genre: Graphic Novel Award: There were no awards listed either for the graphic novel or the traditional novel on which it is based. Star Rating:Four Stars Grade level(s):6-10th grade The language is easily accessible for most students. Within this age range, teaching students about a period of history to which they often cannot relate is difficult without good visuals. The graphic novel allows students to visualize the experiences of the abbot mice, while simultaneously delving into the history of the medieval period and all of the Genre: Graphic Novel Award: There were no awards listed either for the graphic novel or the traditional novel on which it is based. Star Rating:Four Stars Grade level(s):6-10th grade The language is easily accessible for most students. Within this age range, teaching students about a period of history to which they often cannot relate is difficult without good visuals. The graphic novel allows students to visualize the experiences of the abbot mice, while simultaneously delving into the history of the medieval period and all of the ramifications that were involved in survival during that period. Summary: All is peaceful and calm for the inhabitants of Redwall Abbey, before the assault of the evil Cluny the Scourge, an diabolical one-eyed rat. Nothing will stop this creature in his mission, nothing except a recurring dream of his, a dream of Martin the Warrior. We learn Martin has been dead for many years. What will the mice of Redwall Abbey do? An awkward young novice, Matthias, has hope and an ancient prophesy tells of the return of Martin in the “I am that is.” With distinct characterization Brian Jacques creates vivid and life-like characters such as the powerful badger Constance, a mute squirrel named Silent Sam, a bold rabbit named Basil Stag Hare. It is an archetypal quest story of animalistic proportions. Jacques’ hero is not overly glorified in his victory, because it is one of unity, not of individual prowess. The ultimate triumph of good over evil is all the more refreshing seen through the eyes of a humble “church mouse.” Evaluation: Redwall is a good example of the use of the graphic novel genre for young adult literature. This graphic novel has visual impact that showcases the artistic ability of the creator and highlights the difficult life of anyone living in the middle ages. The novel very effectively blends text and art; although the novel does not use color it would be superfluous to the story. This story does contain some of the best qualities of its literary genre, historical fiction. The plot is interesting and enjoyable. The historical events of political alliances, knights, etc are authentic. The events, attitudes, and behaviors reflect the values and spirit of the time. Although it was frustrating and slightly disturbing the way in which the sparrow people were marginalized and their language was little more than a pigeon. The themes however, do provide insights into contemporary problems. The story itself and the illustrations are appropriate for adolescents. Description of the ending: The ending of this story is semi-open. Although, the Abbey is saved from rat invasion and destruction by the brave mouse Matthias, thus resolving the primary problems of the novel, it is not an ultimate conclusion. Because Matthias is the “reincarnation” of Martin the Warrior, his very name is an anagram for “I am that is” the reader is left hopeful that there will be future reasons for Matthias to defend his sacred home. b. Choice Young adult Books 1. Suggestions This novel would be useful in teaching these elements: a. Students to understand organizational structures of literary and informational material. (Not all material in the news or in real world experiences is written, thus using a graphic novel and examining visual depictions can prepare students to understand visual text.) b. Students to identify how allusions from a variety of sources (e.g., literary, mythological, religious, historical) contribute to literature. (There are variety of historical references to medieval constructs, the importance of the church to daily life, the walled city siege, etc.) 2. Read Aloud pg. 53 Methuselah the ancient scribe reads to Matthias from the legend of Martin the Warrior “Who says that I am dead knows nought at all. I-am that is, two mice within Redwall. The warrior sleeps ‘twixt hall and cavern hole. I-am that is, take on my mighty role. Look for the sword in moonlight streaming forth, at night, when day’s first hour reflects the north. From o’er the threshold seek and you will see; I-am that is, my sword will wield for me.” Pg. 105 Matthias runs into a vegetarian barn cat. “‘Phut’ Matthias lay wet and sticky quivering all over, dust and straw clinging to his fur He had no chance to make a run for it and he could not stop his body from quaking badly. He lay staring into the feline eyes . . . great twin pools of turquoise flecked with gold . . .” Pg. 142 Father Abbot’s last words. “Lift my head a little and I will tell you what my failing eyes can see . . . before I leave you. Ah, yes . . . I see the most beautiful summer say of my life. The sun shines warmly upon us. The friends I know and the love are all about me. Life is good, my friends I leave it to you. Do not be sad, for mine is a most peaceful rest. And Redwall . . . our home . . . is safe.”

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jess

    Graphic novel For 4th grade and up When Redwall Abbey is attacked by rats led by Cluny the Scourge, the young mouse Matthias must enlist the help of other animals and learn to be a warrior. Brian Jacques thick novel has been wittled down to 143 pages and retold in pictures through this graphic novel version. The format may make it more appealing for readers unfamiliar with the series, or intimidated by the length of the books, but the vocabulary is still fairly complex Graphic novel For 4th grade and up When Redwall Abbey is attacked by rats led by Cluny the Scourge, the young mouse Matthias must enlist the help of other animals and learn to be a warrior. Brian Jacques thick novel has been wittled down to 143 pages and retold in pictures through this graphic novel version. The format may make it more appealing for readers unfamiliar with the series, or intimidated by the length of the books, but the vocabulary is still fairly complex and many pages are text-heavy. The black and white illustrations are also detailed and complex, with vivid characters and plenty of intense battle scenes. Fans of the original books will enjoy seeing the characters and setting illustrated, but may miss subplots, details and emotional complexity. There's a lot here to appeal to readers, especially boys, who enjoy animal stories, battle scenes, and epic struggles between good and evil. Rather than replacing the book, the graphic novel could act as an introduction or compliment to the series. Although it's been many years since I read the original book, the plot of the graphic novel felt rushed and slightly flat. It was easy to imagine where more complex, descriptive scenes had been eliminated, as well as moments when remaining faithful to the original may have undermined the effect and pacing of the illustrations. At times, the small font was difficult to read and the illustrations often required careful attention to decode. The book often feels torn between slimming down the story and remaining faithful to the intense detail of the original, and perhaps either more extreme abridgment or greater faithfulness would have led to a superior graphic novel. School Library Journal says that it "captures the spirit and the language of the original," but suggests that the format "makes the action accessible to younger readers," which would probably depend on a younger reader's tolerance for violence but doesn't take into account the challenging vocabulary. Booklist says the transformation to graphic novel has "mixed results," but praises the artwork, saying it "conveys the emotional edge of the animal characters."

  12. 5 out of 5

    Dolly

    Our girls attend a local library book club and Redwall was discussed at the July meeting. One of the club members brought this book - she couldn't get the novel and didn't have time to read it before the meeting. I was excited to see this version; we have become big fans of graphic novels and I was eager to read it. The narrative is very dramatic and engaging and from what I've read of the novel so far (only about a fourth of it), it is faithful to the tale and doesn't lose too much in the adaptation. Our girls attend a local library book club and Redwall was discussed at the July meeting. One of the club members brought this book - she couldn't get the novel and didn't have time to read it before the meeting. I was excited to see this version; we have become big fans of graphic novels and I was eager to read it. The narrative is very dramatic and engaging and from what I've read of the novel so far (only about a fourth of it), it is faithful to the tale and doesn't lose too much in the adaptation. The black and white illustrations are terrific and even a bit scary in parts, but occasionally I found it difficult to figure out who was in the scene and what was going on. It would certainly help to have read the book first. I would recommend this book for middle grade readers due to the violence and dramatic content. I enjoyed reading it and plan to read the rest of the novel soon. I doubt, however, that we'll get into the series much, since our girls did not like the story and gave up rather quickly. Perhaps they'll at least read this version.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Magila

    3.5 I am not an avid Redwall reader. There is something about anthropomorphic animals that has always been off-putting to me. This graphic novel seemed to be a way of bridging that gap. Between the black and white (that felt like it needed color) and the overall story, I started and put this book down a month or two ago. After about 4 pages, I picked something else up, and about 3 novels, 5 graphic novels, and 50 children's books later I decided to give it another go. I'm glad I did. 3.5 I am not an avid Redwall reader. There is something about anthropomorphic animals that has always been off-putting to me. This graphic novel seemed to be a way of bridging that gap. Between the black and white (that felt like it needed color) and the overall story, I started and put this book down a month or two ago. After about 4 pages, I picked something else up, and about 3 novels, 5 graphic novels, and 50 children's books later I decided to give it another go. I'm glad I did. The story of the siege of Redwall would rival anything you will find in The Lord of the Rings. I found this comic to have maybe edited out some important aspects of the book, such as Constance, but overall it was successful. This would be an excellent book for lovers of books on animals that talk, a la Ga'hoole and Chrestomanci. Way better than I thought, but I rounded down because of the painfully slow beginning.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kellie

    How many times have I read the novel version of Redwall? 3 or 4 times. So, I think that I can say with a lot of certainty that the graphic novel edition is very true to the book dialogue/plot wise. I did have to give the book 4/5 stars instead of 5 because I wasn't super thrilled by the art. I loved the style but I didn't really like that it was in black and white. The books always had the most vivid descriptions so I think the graphic novel would've been so much better if it was in color. Overall, this How many times have I read the novel version of Redwall? 3 or 4 times. So, I think that I can say with a lot of certainty that the graphic novel edition is very true to the book dialogue/plot wise. I did have to give the book 4/5 stars instead of 5 because I wasn't super thrilled by the art. I loved the style but I didn't really like that it was in black and white. The books always had the most vivid descriptions so I think the graphic novel would've been so much better if it was in color. Overall, this was a quick read and it was worth the 30 minutes it took to read.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Hazel Honeycutt-Dill

    As you can see, it was a graphic novel and has pictures. It was a very good book. I recommend reading it to your son and daughter. I think you would really like it. The part I really liked was when the sparrows and shrews attacked and you could see the big battle. And I also liked it a lot. It also has a good amount of fantasy so if you like fantasy I think you would like this.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Might get a non-reader interested in reading the real book. It was nice to read the story with images to go along with it. Unfortunately it left out some of my favorite bits. I guess that's what happens when you shrink a longer story into a short story.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Emily D

    i think it was better than the great little madison

  18. 4 out of 5

    Cassie Lanning

    Actual rating: 4.75 stars The book this is based on will always have a special place in my heart as the book that made me love reading. I feel like the graphic novel not only captured the spirit of the story, but actually showed most of said story how I imagined it. I actually read this a long time ago and actually have vivid memories of thinking the pictures of Cluny looked really terrifying (bear in mind that I was still in the 5-11 age range). Now, despite the fact that I love Actual rating: 4.75 stars The book this is based on will always have a special place in my heart as the book that made me love reading. I feel like the graphic novel not only captured the spirit of the story, but actually showed most of said story how I imagined it. I actually read this a long time ago and actually have vivid memories of thinking the pictures of Cluny looked really terrifying (bear in mind that I was still in the 5-11 age range). Now, despite the fact that I love this graphic novel and all of the illustrations are wonderful, I feel that as a longtime fan of the Redwall series, I have every right to nitpick as I see fit. So here are some things I noticed this time through that I didn't notice the first time around because I was so excited about reading it. For anyone that hasn't actually read the real book yet, turn away now because there are some pretty intense SPOILERS AHEAD. YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED. 1. In some parts of the comic, I noticed some characters that I know had names that weren't named (i.e. Ambrose the hedgehog, Winfred the otter, Friar Hugo, etc.). As someone that knows the original text fairly well, this kind of bothered me. I really liked Winfred, and in the book she was the one that fished Matthias out of the abbey pond after he fell off of the roof fighting King Bull Sparra. I also noticed there were some things about Ambrose cut out that I kind of see as important parts of the book. 2. The comic seems to really ride on the back of the fact that the reader read the original book before reading the graphic novel. I think this is really stupid because I'm sure there are a lot of people that pick this up and don't understand some of what's going on because they've never read the book. 3. Going off of a combo of the first 2 reasons, there was a lot of stuff cut out. AND I MEAN A LOT. I understand that this was adapted from a book that had a lot of stuff in it, there was so much good content cut out. There was no feast scene and Friar Hugo didn't get cut off by the savagery of Abbot Mortimer, a lot of really sweet exchanges between Matthias and Cornflower were cut out, and a lot of the humor was gone that really needed to be there to balance out the action. 4. This one is super random and probably stupid to a lot of people, but I thought Jess Squirrel looked too cute. Maybe I'm getting too nitty-gritty here, but I imagined her being more like her animated counterpart. I understand squirrels are supposed to be cute, but I imagine Jess looking something more like Lilly Singh in squirrel form, which I think really happened (and worked super well) in the cartoons. That's really all I have to say, other than that I would highly recommend this to someone that doesn't want to really read the book. But to the people that have read this and haven't read the book yet I say "GO READ THE BOOK! IT'S AMAZING AND UNDERRATED."

  19. 4 out of 5

    The Erudite Gryffinclaw

    What originally got me reading the original book was watching the cartoon. Redwall, regardless of reading a graphic novel or the regular book, this story is a good summer read. (It could be because I originally read the book during the summer time when I was a kid.) The artwork from what I can tell was rendered in charcoal, graphite, and ink. I like how the lighting and for was rendered. I like how the artist(s) did Martin the Warrior justice, how he was portrayed in the tapestry. Als What originally got me reading the original book was watching the cartoon. Redwall, regardless of reading a graphic novel or the regular book, this story is a good summer read. (It could be because I originally read the book during the summer time when I was a kid.) The artwork from what I can tell was rendered in charcoal, graphite, and ink. I like how the lighting and for was rendered. I like how the artist(s) did Martin the Warrior justice, how he was portrayed in the tapestry. Also, Cluny the Scourge was extra creepy in the graphic novel. Only problems with the art. Is how Basil Stag Hare was drawn. The other one is Constance Badger needed something on besides a scarf. (Nothing is shown but she needs something else on her. It can be a short apron for all I care.) The only part I didn't like...Cornflower didn't get enough screen time, as compared to the cartoon or the original book. I know the graphic novel had been adapted, and is therefore shorter, but in the original story and cartoon, Matthias and Cornflower had kind of a friendship/super sweet relationship going. Cornflower honestly believed in Matthias. I didn't know what shipping ( pairing characters together, even if the author doesn't write them winding up together.) was, but I shipped Matthias and Cornflower. Overall, I recommend this book of you are a fan of the series, or this is your first adventure in to Mossflower.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ris

    Everyone keeps telling me I would have been ALL OVER this series if I read it in middle school like (apparently) everyone else did. Alas, I did not. So while I thought it was pretty neat, it wasn't anything overwhelming. I can appreciate in hindsight the nods that some other fiction works I've read and RPGs I've played gave nods to Redwall. But I've also read plenty of fantasy that was written before Redwall, and Redwall seems to be more of that. That isn't bad, per say. I'm just not excited lik Everyone keeps telling me I would have been ALL OVER this series if I read it in middle school like (apparently) everyone else did. Alas, I did not. So while I thought it was pretty neat, it wasn't anything overwhelming. I can appreciate in hindsight the nods that some other fiction works I've read and RPGs I've played gave nods to Redwall. But I've also read plenty of fantasy that was written before Redwall, and Redwall seems to be more of that. That isn't bad, per say. I'm just not excited like I was told I would be. The art is excellent. Great in tone, easy to distinguish, expressive. A little sketchy, but I sort of liked that it felt rough. It fit the time period and the story to be rough and gritty. (The downside was that sometimes I had a hard time figuring out where in the panel to focus, but this was a very rare problem on the whole.) As an aside, I do intend to read the original novel. This one just happened to show up at my local library first. I'm looking forward to getting into the heads of more characters, since the nature of this sort of story in graphic form means all of the focus is on the outside story with little room or ability to delve into thoughts or backstory that isn't immediately relevant.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Stacy Renee (LazyDayLit)

    This review was originally posted on Lazy Day Literature Matthias Mouse dreams of being like Martin the Warrior. When a band of fearsome rats attacks the abbey, led by Cluny the Scourge, he gets his chance. After finding a few clues as to the whereabouts of Martin's famous sword, Matthias sets off on an adventure to claim his right to the sword and protect the creatures of the abbey and the surrounding lands. It has been almost two decades since I read the full novel and there was a lot that I had This review was originally posted on Lazy Day Literature Matthias Mouse dreams of being like Martin the Warrior. When a band of fearsome rats attacks the abbey, led by Cluny the Scourge, he gets his chance. After finding a few clues as to the whereabouts of Martin's famous sword, Matthias sets off on an adventure to claim his right to the sword and protect the creatures of the abbey and the surrounding lands. It has been almost two decades since I read the full novel and there was a lot that I had forgotten so this was a wonderful reminder of the story. It has definitely helped me make a decision about starting this series over again since I've always been a fan of anthropomorphic stories. The illustrations are in black and white but still do an amazing job of bringing out the essence of the characters, even if the rats do look quite frightful. I think perhaps that there is a lot missing from the story here but all the action parts are definitely there so anyone looking for a quick, fun read will find it to their liking.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Rachitoff

    1. Awards the book has received (if any): N/A 2. Appropriate grade level(s): 4th grade and above 3. Original 3-line summary: This book is about Redwall Abbey and a mouse carrier named Matthias. There is a rat army coming to try and attack Redwall. Matthia must follow in Martin the Warrior's footsteps to help save his community before Cluny's rat army destroys everything. 4. Original 3-line review: The illustrations are captivating and will keep the students engaged. There is also action involved 1. Awards the book has received (if any): N/A 2. Appropriate grade level(s): 4th grade and above 3. Original 3-line summary: This book is about Redwall Abbey and a mouse carrier named Matthias. There is a rat army coming to try and attack Redwall. Matthia must follow in Martin the Warrior's footsteps to help save his community before Cluny's rat army destroys everything. 4. Original 3-line review: The illustrations are captivating and will keep the students engaged. There is also action involved in the graphic novel that keeps it fast paced for the students and interesting. The text is simply enough for younger readers to comprehend it. 5. 2-3 possible in-class uses Students can create their own mouse warrior, or create themselves into a character in Redwall based off one of their favorite characters. This is part of a series of graphic novels. Students can read the other books in the series, and write about their favorite and why they chose that book.

  23. 5 out of 5

    StrangeAeons

    I love Redwall, but I'm a bit conflicted as to my opinion on this graphic novelization. At 143 pages, this is a truncated version of the first novel in an epic saga, which will always be best suited to be read on the page. You do lose some depth of Brian Jacques' original prose (edited here by Stuart Moore). However, I did love seeing the world of Redwall come to life and I could see this serving as a good introduction for some folks, especially considering the 22 novels that make up I love Redwall, but I'm a bit conflicted as to my opinion on this graphic novelization. At 143 pages, this is a truncated version of the first novel in an epic saga, which will always be best suited to be read on the page. You do lose some depth of Brian Jacques' original prose (edited here by Stuart Moore). However, I did love seeing the world of Redwall come to life and I could see this serving as a good introduction for some folks, especially considering the 22 novels that make up the Redwall series can be rather intimidating to jump into. There's merit here and I rather like the dark black and white artwork by Bret Blevins. I could see 10 year old me totally immersed in this, much as I was with the original novel.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Katka Lady

    I have not read the novel version of this book, and perhaps you need to in order to fill in what feels like large gaps and details that are missing from this version. It is quite choppy and fast paced. It doesn't have the kind of character developed that feels needed in order for Matthias to change from the clumsy dreamer to the heroic warrior. Also some of the villains are so quickly dealt with that it feels like they were hardly that dangerous at all. I found this just kinda meh.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jeremiah John

    My four-year-old son absolutely loved this graphic novel. The evil in it is absolute, and the good is well-defined. That is, the evil rats kill their own kind as well as the innocent, and the good mice are loath to fire arrows that could injure even creatures attacking them. Children need these distinctions in a world of Batmen to give them a ground from which later transgressions become interesting. I do wish it was color, but I still rate it five stars.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lucas Miller

    This copy came from a middle school library. It hadn't been checked out very recently. We just finished reading the first Redwall aloud to our daughter and this was a fun, quick read that I think highlights the action/adventure angle of the book while making it feel even more like a kid's book. If you are a fan of the series, this is a very quick, nearly visual summary of the book.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Nighteye

    Very very beautiful graphic novel in black and white illustrations. Full coverage of the detailed story and a greast complement to the series as scales between the rats and mouses is good and we'll depicted. Just watched the Redwall TV series season 1-3 and this gives as detailed coverage as this. The story comes alive in a beautiful and sometimes brutal manner.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Victoria

    Having been a fan of Redwall for many years, I was excited to read this adaptation. However, if I had not already been familiar with the story, it would have been nearly impossible to follow due to the lack of narration in the graphic novel. As a Redwall fan, I enjoyed the book, but as a reader it left much to be desired.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    Wow! This got intense pretty quickly. And was pretty dark at times. I wonder how this differs from the novels. It seems like there could be some good exposition that might make the story flow a little better. It was ok. 2.5 Stars.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Scott Hayden

    Redwall, sanctuary of healing and help, needs a warrior. Cluny the Scourge has laid seige to Redwall, but a warrior haunts his dreams. Will the spirit of of Martin return? Can Mathias find the sword? And, can foxes be trusted?

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