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The sixth - and final - instalment of the inimitable SPELLSLINGER series. Kellen and Reichis are settling into their new lives as protectors of the young queen and dealing with the constantly shifting threats to her reign and to her life. For the first time in his life, Kellen feels as if he's becoming the kind of man that his mentor Ferius had wanted him to be. Even Reich The sixth - and final - instalment of the inimitable SPELLSLINGER series. Kellen and Reichis are settling into their new lives as protectors of the young queen and dealing with the constantly shifting threats to her reign and to her life. For the first time in his life, Kellen feels as if he's becoming the kind of man that his mentor Ferius had wanted him to be. Even Reichis has come to appreciate having a noble purpose - so long as no one minds him committing the occasional act of theft from the royal treasury. But what seems to be a simple card game between Kellen and an old man is soon revealed to be a deadly game of wits in which a powerful mage has trapped the queen's spellslinger in order to kill him. Perfect for fans of The Dark Tower, Firefly, Guardians of the Galaxy, Terry Pratchett, Ben Aaronovitch and Jim Butcher.


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The sixth - and final - instalment of the inimitable SPELLSLINGER series. Kellen and Reichis are settling into their new lives as protectors of the young queen and dealing with the constantly shifting threats to her reign and to her life. For the first time in his life, Kellen feels as if he's becoming the kind of man that his mentor Ferius had wanted him to be. Even Reich The sixth - and final - instalment of the inimitable SPELLSLINGER series. Kellen and Reichis are settling into their new lives as protectors of the young queen and dealing with the constantly shifting threats to her reign and to her life. For the first time in his life, Kellen feels as if he's becoming the kind of man that his mentor Ferius had wanted him to be. Even Reichis has come to appreciate having a noble purpose - so long as no one minds him committing the occasional act of theft from the royal treasury. But what seems to be a simple card game between Kellen and an old man is soon revealed to be a deadly game of wits in which a powerful mage has trapped the queen's spellslinger in order to kill him. Perfect for fans of The Dark Tower, Firefly, Guardians of the Galaxy, Terry Pratchett, Ben Aaronovitch and Jim Butcher.

30 review for Crownbreaker

  1. 5 out of 5

    Samm | Sassenach the Book Wizard

    okay for real...the US covers for this series need to go away and be replaced by the glorious UK ones

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jon Adams

    That postscript was perfect.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Pen

    I'll admit that I begrudgingly picked up Spellslinger when I was in a reading funk and looking for something light and short to try and trigger my reading momentum. 6 books later I can attest to the fact that it just might have worked as I quickly became a big fan of the series. From characters, to story, to narration to cover art, every book has kept me wanting more and this one was no exception. A fun, well rounded, exceptionally paced and thoroughly entertaining series. I have zero hesitation I'll admit that I begrudgingly picked up Spellslinger when I was in a reading funk and looking for something light and short to try and trigger my reading momentum. 6 books later I can attest to the fact that it just might have worked as I quickly became a big fan of the series. From characters, to story, to narration to cover art, every book has kept me wanting more and this one was no exception. A fun, well rounded, exceptionally paced and thoroughly entertaining series. I have zero hesitation is saying de Castell is an author you can trust. I'm sorry to say goodbye, but I can't wait for more.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Nikki

    Five stars. Always. 💙💙💙💙💙 I loved this so much. It felt like a perfect way to round out Kellen’s adventures so far, and to let us see the bigger picture that we’ve been glimpsing throughout when it comes to politics. I really don’t want to spoil anything so I will say that I continue to love the people we knew, and really enjoyed some of the new characters we meet. And Sebastien’s post script was perfect.

  5. 5 out of 5

    explorerofbooks

    I can’t recommend this series enough, especially now I know De Castell truly knows how to write an ending. Even though he said Kellen and his friends would always be in our hearts, this goodbye still hurt. Spellslinger will always be one of my favorite fantasy series, filled with tricks, magic, realism and best of all, innovative characters. Sometimes, we don’t need a hero. Sometimes, we just need our wits and a little fear to remind us we’re alive. And…yeah, a good book also helps. Kellen and Reichis are g I can’t recommend this series enough, especially now I know De Castell truly knows how to write an ending. Even though he said Kellen and his friends would always be in our hearts, this goodbye still hurt. Spellslinger will always be one of my favorite fantasy series, filled with tricks, magic, realism and best of all, innovative characters. Sometimes, we don’t need a hero. Sometimes, we just need our wits and a little fear to remind us we’re alive. And…yeah, a good book also helps. Kellen and Reichis are growing into their jobs as protectors of the young Daroman queen, even if this means the royal marshal service keeps bugging them all the time. Kellen has made many enemies over the years, and they won’t be the last. Even his own family has turned against him more than once now. Imagine his surprise when mage sovereign and father Ke’heops come to ask for his aid. The Berabesq have a foreign god by their side, and finally united, they are ready for war. Unforeseen circumstances make him accept the preposition. Finding his place in this world will have to wait, because now he has to travel to the most heavily guarded city in the world to assassinate a spiritual miracle. After all, isn’t an ambitious trickster the best kind of assassin? As if De Castell didn’t already put enough detailed work into building up his world, we finally got a map. Not that it was necessary with his vivid descriptions, but it was still a pleasant way to end the series with. We start our adventure again with a certain defeat, but that’s as repetitive as it goes. Instead, we focus on different relationships and characters this time, where Kellen can no longer abandon his duty to make choices. Once again, the reader falls in love with the wonderful, whimsical card illustrations in the book. I read it in the e-book format, but the actual physical copy I’ll buy in a few months has golden-sprayed edges. I’m saying all of this, because all of the Spellslinger covers are single masterpieces. Every part of it, front to back fits into the plot, and yet, the series are so underrated. Accompanied by a simple writing style that hooks you in from the beginning, De Castell has managed to overwhelm me for six books long. He throws away the trope of the chosen one, and morphs it into something greater: a witty trickster, whose enemies are physically stronger than him in every way. Kellen is never sure of his victory, but he sure outwits a lot of the villains on his path. Spellslinger has always been strongly based on culture, religion and family, which lead to realism. In this particular web of lies and deception, there was no difference. It’s intimidating, what people will do for survival and legacy, but it’s also truth. De Castell has put the world we are familiar with in a high fantasy jacket, filled with memorable Argosi lessons. At the end of this series, you’ll feel as if you’re some sort of wise trickster yourself (thank you, maetri Ferius). The means don’t always justify the ends, and there is no right person to who one owns duty. A villain always has a villain on his own, and forgiveness is not the same as acceptance. Honestly, one of my favorite lessons was the one Kellen learned completely by himself. You don’t own anything to your family. You are who you make yourself to be, not who your upbringing decides you to be. It is not the family by blood that binds you, but the family you lean on by choice. And well, we all know Kellen had the most amazing companions one could ask for. In the end, everything made sense from the first book to the last. All these surprising twists together formed such an incredible way to end this journey. Yes, I slightly predicted the initial outcome, but that simply meant growth for our characters. And surprisingly, there were more villains than I predicted. All of them were complicated, and due to the fast pace, I was left biting my nails in agony many times. None of these morally complex enemies knew what they were doing was wrong, and even though you don’t support them, you can see where they come from. You can see that if you wouldn’t have seen the story through Kellen’s perspective, he might have been the villain to you. That’s how you write a good one, and De Castell even managed to involve the delicate case of mental abuse into this. All in all, I won’t be leaving this world for a while. Crownbreaker was my favorite book in the whole series, and can set 4 stars on his name. Every chapter ended with such a cliffhanger that it was impossible to put it down. Unlike many final books, it wasn’t confusing. In fact, we saw many reunions occur, where the previous books got summarized again. I did miss the occasional element of gore, which was necessary in the former books. Granted, the violent events were definitely gruesome. Apart from the hilarious humor, there was also some cutting-edge quality added to our major characters. Kellen finally starts using more different attacks other than the powders in his pocket. This also included his shadowblack enigmatism, although we unfortunately didn’t get an answer about the potential consuming darkness behind the markings. In the end, our hero did come to realize what he stands for, and what (or who) he wants to fight for. Yet, if De Castell made one thing obvious, it’s that the road to self-development never ends. It’s all about the journey, and well…a Path is infinite. So is the world of Spellslinger.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Dawn

    Fantastic final book! Very satisfying ending; a few things i guessed correctly and others were surprising. I loved watching Kellen mature and grow in many ways over the course of the series. Ferius is one of my all-time fave characters and was brilliantly written throughout. And as for Reichis, who doesn’t love a snarky, eyeball-eating squirrel cat?

  7. 4 out of 5

    Fiona

    I am so sad to see this series end but it was so good! I am very happy with that ending.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Contrarius

    Dammit, I have to wait til DECEMBER??

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ankita Malakar

    Loved the entire series and I want a damned squirrel cat as well!!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Einas Alhamali

    I'm not okay

  11. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    I'm so deeply invested at this point that I don't even know where to start this review. All I can really think of to say is that the postscript in it's entirety might be the single best ending to a series that I've ever read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Dreximgirl

    I bloody loved this! Sebastien is hands down one of my favourite writers and the Spellslinger series has been such a joy to read. Kellen, Reichis, Ferius and the rest have all become such beloved characters and while I'm sad to say goodbye I'm happy that it was such a perfect ending. Everything came together and threads right from the start pulled together. Adored it. If you haven't read the series go read it now!!!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kimberley

    So I’ve just finished Crownbreaker and I’m still ugly crying. I LOVED IT! I loved it all! I’m rubbish at writing reviews but I always will for this series no matter how bad/rambling they are. The best part... through out the whole thing I was dreading finishing this series. Something about it just clicked with me, and I wasn’t ready to not have another book to look forward to but then I got to this part ‘Every a story has a final page, the one we hesitate to turn for fear of doing so closes the So I’ve just finished Crownbreaker and I’m still ugly crying. I LOVED IT! I loved it all! I’m rubbish at writing reviews but I always will for this series no matter how bad/rambling they are. The best part... through out the whole thing I was dreading finishing this series. Something about it just clicked with me, and I wasn’t ready to not have another book to look forward to but then I got to this part ‘Every a story has a final page, the one we hesitate to turn for fear of doing so closes the door on places, people and squirrel cats we’ve only begun to truly know. Yet turn the page we must, because there are thousands of stories awaiting each and everyone one of us, and it’s is unwise to linger too long inside just one.’ And all the rest that came after and even though I was still crying it was like I had taken a massive deep breath and that allowed me to put the dust jacket back on and place the book in its space on the shelf next to the rest, where I can look at it and smile and imagine all sorts of adventures for Kellen, Reichis and Ferius. If your still reading this I can’t recommend this series enough!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Yuli Atta

    I loved this 😭😭

  15. 4 out of 5

    Helen Lane

    An amazing end to one of my favourite series. I can’t figure out how anyone can write that well. Just make sure you keep reading past the author’s note to the very last page!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Deniz Sezer

    A very very good ending to a marvelous coming of age story. I really enjoyed the tale and the characters. Hope Mr. Castell gives us more witty and intelligent characters in interesting stories.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Robert Turner

    An almost perfect conclusion to an excellent series, and that was before the postscript's injection of warmth and fuzziness and a call to use some imagination.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Eve

    Oh. Man. Wow. Okay. This is fine. I'm fine. I am not sitting on my bed with all six Spellslinger books next to me, my hands are not shaking, and I am absolutely not crying. Long story short, Sebastien de Castell has done it again. He's written a series that I adore - for the worldbuilding, for the plots, for the writing itself, but most of all for the characters - and has finished it with a book that's the culmination of everything the series has been leading up to. Crownbreaker's pro Oh. Man. Wow. Okay. This is fine. I'm fine. I am not sitting on my bed with all six Spellslinger books next to me, my hands are not shaking, and I am absolutely not crying. Long story short, Sebastien de Castell has done it again. He's written a series that I adore - for the worldbuilding, for the plots, for the writing itself, but most of all for the characters - and has finished it with a book that's the culmination of everything the series has been leading up to. Crownbreaker's probably not a perfect novel, but, quite frankly, there are too many tears in my eyes for me to notice. I can't write a fair, level-headed review of it (not yet, anyway - maybe in a few months and after a few rereads I'll be able to.) So instead, I'll do what I do best, and put down all my incoherent thoughts about the book and the series and honestly I'll probably start talking about the Greatcoats too, because dammit I really love everything Sebastien de Castell's ever written, and I don't have anyone to talk to about it. I'll mark spoilers for Crownbreaker, but not for the other books in the series or the Greatcoats, so... beware? I actually bought Spellslinger long before I read the Greatcoats series - way back in 2017, when I was a 13-year-old hiding from the rain in the Waterstones near her school, and Spellslinger was newly published. I know this because (a) that specific Waterstones closed not long after, and (b) I own the extremely lovely hardback copy of the book. This extremely lovely hardback then proceeded to live on my bookshelf for two and a half years for reasons that I really can't remember, I seemingly forgot how to read for a while, and then the desperate desire to ignore the looming threat of my exams drove me back to Waterstones, where I picked up Traitor's Blade and thus doomed myself to an eternity at Sebastien de Castell's literary mercy. Over the fortnight-or-so in which I read the Spellslinger series, I also thought a lot about the Greatcoats. Kellen and Falcio are certainly similar in some ways - both are witty narrators who could probably do with some therapy, both would definitely be dead twenty times over if it weren't for their friends, and Kellen definitely seems to have gone to the Falcio val Mond School Of Talking To Girls. They both have two best friends, who could be vaguely mapped onto each other. Reichis and Brasti are both rogues in some sense, both often serve as comic relief, and both tend to see killing whoever's causing them trouble and then taking their money and/or eyeballs as the most efficient solution to most problems. Ferius and Kest both vastly outclass their respective protagonists in most ways, but also love them deeply and would go out of their way to protect them. Actually, I want to talk about Ferius Parfax some more, because I think she's maybe my favourite character in all of literature ever. When I first picked up Spellslinger and read the blurb, I was a little bit afraid that there would end up being some weird, irritating romance between Ferius and Kellen. That worry was probably one of the things that led to it sitting on my bookshelf for so long. Mercifully, not only were my romantic fears unfounded, the relationship between the two of them turned out to be my favourite thing about the entire series. Ferius is pretty much Kellen's antithesis - she follows a path of joy and love, never resorts to violence if she can at all avoid it, and is both extremely competent and wildly charming. And she comes across this boy, 15 years old, whose own sister has just stopped his heart, and she saves his life, physically. And then she sticks around. She protects the boy even though he's a coward and weak and frankly not even that nice. She gives him the choice to come with her, and she teaches him even though he's not always a very good student, and she loves him fiercely because that's who she is. I really, really think more authors could do with having a character or two who's driven by joy. The end of Charmcaster disappointed me a little bit, because it meant leaving Ferius behind for two and a half books. It was probably what Kellen needed in order to become the person he wanted to be, and probably also what the series needed to prevent anything becoming repetitive, but still. It was hard, and I feel I deserve a medal or something now. There were, if you hadn't noticed, a hell of a lot of things that I loved about the Spellslinger series, and which made it really excellent. (Sometimes I weigh up the question of whether or not I loved it more than the Greatcoats series, and whether or not it was better, but I'm still drawing a blank on that one.) For one thing, I feel the worldbuilding is much stronger in this series. I found that Tristia needed a few books to really take shape for me (and I always struggled a little bit keeping all the duchies straight, although that's just because I'm pretty thick), whereas I got an immediate sense of the Jan'Tep land, people, and culture straight off the bat, and this trend continued with the various other cultures Kellen visited over the cource of the series. I also felt things got a lot stronger on the diversity front - there was more space for characters who weren't white, more women in more significant and varied roles (although the Greatcoats was always fairly good on this front, I feel Spellslinger took it a lot further), and, to my surprise/delight/general overwhelming emotion that led to me crying for about an hour, queer characters exist. One of my (other) favourite things about Spellslinger is that Kellen's ultimately just searching for belonging. He wants to be safe and loved and have a home and family, because these are things that he barely had before the start of the series, and certainly struggled to find afterwards, between the shadowblack and the being an outlaw and the looming threat of war. I'm always tempted to laugh at the way Kellen almost has a "girl of the book" throughout the series - Nephenia in Spellslinger, Seneira in Shadowblack, Nephenia again in Charmcaster, Diadera in Soulbinder, Mariadne in Queenslayer, and now both Torian and Nephenia in Crownbreaker - but when I think a little harder about it, I'm more likely to cry, because all of these girls ultimately offered Kellen some kind of comfort or understanding or acceptance (but once he had it, he had no idea what to do with it.) I love that the ending of Crownbreaker (view spoiler)[isn't Kellen settling down in the way that I'd initially hoped it would be before I read it. He looks at the offers of a home - with Seneira in the Seven Sands, with Torian in Darome, with Shalla back among the Jan'Tep - and decides no. He might be a pretty lousy outlaw, bruised and broke, but it's what he was born for, and he will wander the world because he is the Path of Endless Stars. Also, the thing about the Argosi coming from Tristia? I called it, and am much too pleased with myself, and also expect a six-book crossover series in which Ferius encounters every single named character from the Greatcoats series. So, that was a pretty incoherent review that barely talked about the book I'm supposed to be reviewing, but it's late and I'm tired and have a lot of feelings so I'm not even going to edit it. You're welcome. I don't think the book is out in the USA yet (bad luck lads), but please take my word for it when I say that it is absolutely worth buying, reading, and then treasuring forever once it comes out. Also, I'm so sorry that you guys don't have the same covers as us, because this one is shiny gold, and that is just ridiculously cool. (hide spoiler)]

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sheridan Kunde

    I think this was a very interesting conclusion to the series. Sometimes it feels like this series has been dragging a little unsure of where it is going. But considering it's protagonist this seems appropriate and I have always enjoyed the journey. The really enjoyed the beginning of this book and it just felt like a beautiful foundation for the rest of the rest of the book and it got you excited despite knowing you're about to finish this amazing series. The ending felt li I think this was a very interesting conclusion to the series. Sometimes it feels like this series has been dragging a little unsure of where it is going. But considering it's protagonist this seems appropriate and I have always enjoyed the journey. The really enjoyed the beginning of this book and it just felt like a beautiful foundation for the rest of the rest of the book and it got you excited despite knowing you're about to finish this amazing series. The ending felt like the series had been leading towards it the whole time which is the sign of a very good ending. It did feel like this was a culmination of the series with all of the characters brought back together if only for a token moment. Reichis and Ferrius (I've been listening on audiobook so apologies for spelling! This also may the reason I loved these characters so much.) are my favourite characters so it was awesome to see them again. I was disappointed with the way Nefenia and Kellan's relationship went. I have also never appreciated Kellan also seeming to build a relationship with whatever female was closest. Kellan's and Torian's relationship felt a little bit forced but I liked how Kellen explained it and how it played out at least. I have been listening to the audiobooks and the narrator is amazing so I would definitely recommend this to those who are a bit fussy about what audiobooks they listen to. *SLIGHTLY SPOILERY?* There was also a certain plot twist (I mean there's always a lot of plot twists but...) that I really felt betrayed by. I don't want to create spoilers so I won't go into details but hopefully you'll recognise it when you see it. In other spoilery related disappointments a MAJOR plot point is still not resolved by the end of the book. You know, the thing the whole series has pretty much been about. Yeah, that. Still not resolved! Or maybe I was too caught up in the WTF ending? Who knows!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ian Clark

    A worthy finale to an intriguing series. A cracking pace with characters that develop and a great resolution. Bravo Mr de Castell!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Glenn

    The final book in a series is always a nervous read, will everything turn out well? Will the ending feel justified, fulfilling? The answer for the spellslinger series is: Yes! The final moments made me so happy and I couldn’t have wished for a better send off for Kellen. The fact that every book is technically a stand alone story but on one path was executed perfectly, the moment where everything from the previous 5 books all comes together and you didn’t even realise the b The final book in a series is always a nervous read, will everything turn out well? Will the ending feel justified, fulfilling? The answer for the spellslinger series is: Yes! The final moments made me so happy and I couldn’t have wished for a better send off for Kellen. The fact that every book is technically a stand alone story but on one path was executed perfectly, the moment where everything from the previous 5 books all comes together and you didn’t even realise the breadcrumbs were there was very satisfying. Now excuse me while I eat some butter biscuits and take a bath......

  22. 5 out of 5

    jonathan finn

    Ends on a high note Crownbreaker is the final book , for now , in the Spellslinger Ya series. Spellslinger follows the adventures of kellen a exile and outcast from a nation of mages cursed with the ShadowBlack a mystical disease whose sufferers are killed on sight in many parts of the world, with most of his innate magic locked away due to events earlier in the series, kellen relies on tricks, deception and intuition to get by which makes in the parlance of his people a Spellslinger. On the Ends on a high note Crownbreaker is the final book , for now , in the Spellslinger Ya series. Spellslinger follows the adventures of kellen a exile and outcast from a nation of mages cursed with the ShadowBlack a mystical disease whose sufferers are killed on sight in many parts of the world, with most of his innate magic locked away due to events earlier in the series, kellen relies on tricks, deception and intuition to get by which makes in the parlance of his people a Spellslinger. On the outs with his people and his family, his father is the mage sovereign, Crownbreaker finds things coming to a ahead as kellen finds himself once more pulled into events in order to prevent the planet spanning war foretold by The Argosi, a group of highly individualistic and highly competent wanderers who practice a form of cards similar to Tarot and whose number kellen finds himself a member of. The heart of this novel and series is the relationships there are many but the core is between Reichis, kellens Business partner a Squirrel cat who he has a psychic bond and Ferius his beloved mentor in the ways of the Argosi, and his family on the other hand Shalla his sister brilliant and overbearing and his father. Turn between the two sides the entire series a trajedy forces kellen to pick a side as a army of fanatics controlled from the shadows looks set to annihilate everyone he loves. I don’t want to spoil so I will say while this series hasn’t been without its flaws, the plotting could be tighter and some of the middle volumes probably count as filler, the heart of the series has always been about the journey even as crownbreaker ends somewhat open ended don’t expect too much closure it also ends on a high note as one of my favourite series well paced with a lot of heart and with a central message of being true to yourself.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Andre

    I really enjoyed reading this series, it was probably the series I burned through the fastest. De Castell managed to provide convincing and interesting worldbuilding (with a strong focus on culture and religion), likeable and believable characters and of course a wild ride of a story. I thoroughly enjoyed the tone and style of the narration. The last part of the series shows us Kellen's world on the brink of war and Kellen might be the one to stop it. But is he ready to go all in and I really enjoyed reading this series, it was probably the series I burned through the fastest. De Castell managed to provide convincing and interesting worldbuilding (with a strong focus on culture and religion), likeable and believable characters and of course a wild ride of a story. I thoroughly enjoyed the tone and style of the narration. The last part of the series shows us Kellen's world on the brink of war and Kellen might be the one to stop it. But is he ready to go all in and pay the price? The story had enough surprising parts for me, but I guess the final confrontation was one you might have seen coming. The solution not so much. In contrast to other "final books", this one really gave a lot of answers to questions/mysteries from earlier books and it closed the circle that was started in book 1. Thank you, Mr de Castell, for these wonderful books and this wonderful world of yours. And of course for squirrel cats. And just maybe we'll hear from Kellen and his friends again at some point.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Justin

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. A series conclusion that leaves you wanting for more. The Spellslinger series has a lot going for it. Maybe too much. Each book raised the wager a little more than the last by adding new characters, new magics, and new personal developments. But when it finally came time to play his hand, the author revealed a somewhat disappointing set of cards. (view spoiler)[ * Kellen's mother dies before we ever get A series conclusion that leaves you wanting for more. The Spellslinger series has a lot going for it. Maybe too much. Each book raised the wager a little more than the last by adding new characters, new magics, and new personal developments. But when it finally came time to play his hand, the author revealed a somewhat disappointing set of cards. (view spoiler)[ * Kellen's mother dies before we ever get to know her. * Kellen's main love interest remains as elusive as ever. * Kellen's curse is unchanged. * Kellen's queen is shown to be a liar, taking the punch out of the previous book. * Kellen's one-time friends (Seneira, Pan, Butelious) rarely get more than a page. (hide spoiler)] Despite any misgivings about how loose-ends were tied up, Crownbreaker stands tall as an individual novel. Recommended for fans of the series.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jacey

    The final book about spellslinger Kellen and his snarky, eyeball-eating squirrel-cat, Reichis. Kellen has settled down as the Daroman Queen's tutor of cards (and her protector), but there are rumours of war. Everything comes together for Kellen who finally has to confront his family, his people and his own innate talent, which is certainly no match for his father's – so that's going to be a problem when it comes to the crunch. This draws together strands from the whole six book series. There's t The final book about spellslinger Kellen and his snarky, eyeball-eating squirrel-cat, Reichis. Kellen has settled down as the Daroman Queen's tutor of cards (and her protector), but there are rumours of war. Everything comes together for Kellen who finally has to confront his family, his people and his own innate talent, which is certainly no match for his father's – so that's going to be a problem when it comes to the crunch. This draws together strands from the whole six book series. There's the return of all our favourite characters from previous books, including Ferius. I highly recommend this series and also de Castell's Greatcoats Quartet.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ran

    Great read, the whole series is very good. There is one thing I didn't get: Shujan is actually the creation of Ke'heops: he provided the necessary knowledge of shadowblack to create him so that the Daroman and the Berabesq would destroy one another. Doesn’t that mean that the malediction is his creation too? And that he is actually responsible for the death of Bene’maat?

  27. 4 out of 5

    ELC

    The story didn't explain the one thing i wanted to know, but - as always - Crownbreaker is an exciting & a fun read.. finished it in one day (without loosing sleep & still going to work).. Is this really the finale..? Doesn't feel that way (crossing my finger :))

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lirio Dendron

    Sometimes having read a book is like leaving good friends, going on without them, leaving them to their own fates. This book was one of those. Very seldom do I give four stars in a rating. This book was one of those.

  29. 4 out of 5

    M

    4.5 ⭐

  30. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Louise

    3.5

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